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University of Novi Sad, Academy of Arts
Institute of Ethnography SASA
Serbian Games Association (SGA)

Third International Video Game Studies Conference (SVI2024)

Artificial Game

The development of computational intelligence has been closely related to the principles of games from the very beginning. Alan Turing (1950) was among the first to wonder whether machines could master imitation rather than whether they were able to think, and his followers and other scientists developed these ideas further, by creating computer games such as tic-tac-toe, nim, checkers, and chess. Today, artificial intelligence is the driving force behind many questions concerning some of the most diverse aspects of human life, from its role in production, education, medicine, art, ethics, law, communications, transportation, finance, all the way to its role in the development of video games.

Until the latest breakthrough in the study of artificial intelligence, its use in video games was primarily limited to NPC interactions with the player. It has now become clear that, at a time when many companies have already developed generative programs that automate tasks in the domain of game art, animation and narrative design, the emergence of artificial intelligence hints at drastic changes in production, ways of playing and changes in games themselves. Automation of creativity, a phrase that sounds like an oxymoron, has become a reality in many creative industries, especially with artificial intelligence capable of learning and being creative thanks to the availability of huge databases. This is especially true in the video game industry which has always used the latest technologies to create the best video games possible.

In addition to all these issues, the emergence and accelerated development of artificial intelligence has a number of implications ranging across interpretation, consumption and production, closely related to the nature and medium of video games. In addition to being industrial products, video games provide their players with the opportunity to immerse themselves in synthetic worlds and feel present in them. Video games are simulations, artificial dynamic models that simulate spatial relationships, things, beings, events and activities at different levels of abstraction. They generate virtual reality which can be seen as a false image of reality (Baudrillard, 1996) or as an environment filled with the potential (Lévy, 1998) of establishing social connections, education, medical therapy, etc.

SVI 2024

Keynote speaker

Espen Aarseth

Espen Aarseth is professor of game studies and head of the PhD School at the IT-University of Copenhagen, and a member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and of the Academia Europaea. He is founding editor of the journal Game Studies (2001 – ), and recently directed the European Research Council’s Advanced Grant project MSG – Making Sense of Games (2016-22). He is also a special terms professor at the Digital Media Department, School of Art and Communication, Beijing Normal University.

Themes

Video game technology and production

• Video game design: yesterday, today and tomorrow
• The history of artificial intelligence in video games
• AI and the consolidation of power in the gaming industry
• Virtual reality and the metaverse
• Artificial industry: the impact of AI on personnel
• Ethical and legal dilemmas of using AI for game production
• Blockchain and video games – do web3 technologies still have a place in gaming?
• Dark patterns in game design: AI and addiction

Technology and the production of culture

• Video games with an agenda: serious games and social technologies
• Artificial art: video games as art and new media art practices
• Video games as cultural heritage and cultural heritage as video games
• Artificial writers: the role of AI in video game narratives
• Video game narratives as cultural constructs
• The politics of video games: power relations and gaming
• Representations and the role of technology in video game narratives
• Culture and techno-(po)ethics

Technology and the production of reality

• New technologies and new forms of video games
• Game ontologies: what is artificial in games?
• Immersion in video games and the phenomenology of gaming
• Simulacrums of video games: the hyperreality of synthetic worlds
• Playing with players: players as game objects and AI as subject
• Performing identity in virtual worlds
• Video game futurology: technology in video games as futurology (and vice versa)
• Gamification and the “artificialization” of real-world experiences

Participation

Abstract Submission

Abstracts between 200 and 300 words in English, with up to 5 keywords, should be sent to [email protected] or through our Contact form before September 1st, 2024.

Important Dates

Submission Deadlines
Abstracts:
September 1st, 2024

Notification of Acceptance
Abstracts:
October 1st, 2024

Fee Payments Deadlines
October 25th, 2024

Full Papers

Details and guidelines concerning full paper submissions will be posted at a later date, based on editorial policies that will be informed by the prevailing structure, themes and contributions of conference participants.

Participation Options

Online and Live in English language (official language of the conference)

Registration Fee

Live attendance: 50 eur (lunch included)
Online attendance: 40 eur

Presentation Guidelines

In-person attendance (English):

  • Presentation Duration:The oral presentations are 15 minutes, followed by 5-10 minutes of Q&A
  • For 15 minutes of presentation, you can prepare around 15 slides in PowerPoint, including the introduction and end slide.
  • Only MS PowerPoint (*.ppt or *.pptx) presentations will be accepted.
  • Email us your presentation until December 12, 2024 at [email protected]
  • Please, take with you a copy of your presentation to Novi Sad (USB-stick).

Online attendance (English):

  • Online presentations have a duration of 15 minutes, followed by 5-10 minutes of Q&A
  • Links for joining will be sent out before the conference.

Online sessions

University of Novi Sad, Rectory

Committee

Organizing Committee

  • Dušica Dragin – Academy of Arts / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Manojlo Maravić – Academy of Arts / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Stefan Alidini – Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Relja Bobić – Serbian Games Association (SGA)
  • Biljana Ristić – Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Danica Stanković – Academy of Arts / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Krinka Baković – The Institute of Ethnography SASA, Serbia
  • Vesna Trifunović – The Institute of Ethnography SASA, Serbia
  • Tatjana Ristić – SGA, Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Bojana Starčević – Academy of Arts / University of Novi Sad, Serbia

Programme Committee

  • Manojlo Maravić – Academy of Arts / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Dunja Dušanić – Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Stefan Alidini – Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Relja Bobić – Serbian Games Association (SGA)
  • Žolt Lazar – Faculty of Philosophy / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Dušan Ristić – Faculty of Philosophy / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Mila Bujić – Tampere University, Finland
  • Dragan Đorđević – Independent researcher
  • Ljiljana Gavrilović – Full professor in retirement
  • Marko Suvajdžić – Digital Worlds Institute / University of Florida, USA
  • Biljana Mitrović – Faculty of Dramatic Arts / University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia
  • Miloš Jocić – Faculty of Philosophy / University of Novi Sad, Serbia
  • Mladen Čudanov – Faculty of Organisational Sciences / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Gorana Rakić-Bajić – Faculty of Medical Sciences / University of Kragujevac, Serbia
  • Jasmina Arsenijević – Preschool Teacher Training College of Applied Studies, Kikinda, Serbia
  • Zlatko Bukač – Department of English / University of Zadar, Croatia
  • Dobrinka Kuzmanović – Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Ivana Pandžić – Faculty of Philosophy / University of Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Tijana Milošević – Anti-Bullying Centre and ADAPT SFI / Dublin City University, Ireland
  • Krinka Baković – The Institute of Ethnography SASA, Serbia
  • Vesna Trifunović – The Institute of Ethnography SASA, Serbia
  • Tatjana Ristić – SGA, Faculty of Philology / University of Belgrade, Serbia
  • Ljubiša Bojić – Institute for Artificial Intelligence Research and Development of Serbia and Digital Society Lab / Institute for Philosophy and Social Theory / University of Belgrade

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Contact Us

Feel free to send us your abstract or ask for any additional information.

    Address

    SVI Conference
    University of Novi Sad, Rectory
    21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
    Dr Zorana Djindjica 1

    Email

    [email protected]


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